Zapping Dry Eyes – Through the Nose

A new handheld nasal stimulator that is inserted through the nose is providing significant relief for people who suffer from dry eyes, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

TrueTear is a neurostimulator device that produces more tears for dry-eye sufferers. This new device is a drug-free alternative to lubricating eye drops and topical ointments.

In order to test the safety and efficacy of this new device, researchers from Cincinnati Eye Institute asked 97 patients with moderate to severe dryness to use TrueTear for 180 days. (The presentation is available by subscription only. The study has not yet been published or peer-reviewed. Information about it is here. )

After examining patients before and after the nasal stimulation, researchers found that patients’ tear levels were significantly higher after nasal stimulation. The device helped dry-eye patients produce enough tears to keep their eyes moist. No side effects were reported, and patients indicated that TrueTear was easy to use.


Alanna McCatty

Alanna McCatty

Alanna McCatty is founder and CEO of McCatty Scholars, an organization that devises and implements financial literacy programs for students to combat the nationwide issue of the loss of educational opportunity due to the ramifications of burdensome student debt. At MedShadow, she reports on new findings and research on the side effects of prescription drugs. She is a graduate of Pace University.


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