Asthma, Antibiotics, and More

Medicine that doesn’t work, or if overused cases harm, sounds like bad news, but in fact, is good news. About half of common medical practice had never been scientifically proven. Finding out that a common drug doesn’t do what it’s supposed to do saves us from possible harm and wasted money, while allowing us to move on to find a better answer. 

Be well.

 

Asthma 

Inhaled steroids, the standard prescription for asthma, have been found to be no better than a placebo for those with mild asthma. It seems the steroids target a type of inflammation in the airways that is not a common as thought. 

 

Antibiotics and Colon Cancer 

The greater the dose or the longer time antibiotics were taken, the higher the risk of colon cancer. Penicillin, particularly ampicillin/amoxicillin, also showed an increased colon cancer risk. Tetracycline antibiotics appeared to reduce the risk of rectal cancer.

 

Pot for RA?

Despite the enthusiasm, studies have not yet been able to prove that cannabis is helpful, effective or safe for those suffering from rheumatoid arthritis. 

 

Heart Disease and Vitamin D

Because those who have heart disease often have low vitamin D levels, many have postulated that supplemental vitamin D might confer protection from CVD. This review finds no support for that theory. 


Suzanne B. Robotti

Suzanne B. Robotti

Suzanne Robotti founded MedShadow Foundation in 2012. Learn more about Su and her mission.


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