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Rap Sessions: Egypt Protests And Ancient History [Audio]

Rap Sessions: Egypt Protests And Ancient History [Audio]

Bakari Kitwana speaks with Amari Jackson and Anthony Browder about the current political uprising in Egypt. Novelist Amari Jackson talks about the relationship of his new novel, The Savion Sequence, to real life events in the Middle East. And Browder, who has conducted over 40 study tours to Egypt over the last two decades, examines the complex ways that today’s cry for freedom relates to ancient history. RELATED: Top 10 Black movies that should have won an Oscar In this discussion both consider the relationship between ancient Egyptian history and contemporary events, fact and fiction, as well as personal and political freedom. Browder calls the movement in Egypt, “One of the best examples in our lifetime of people trying to achieve their freedom nonviolently.” Amari Jackson is a journalist and the author of The Savion Sequence. Anthony Browder is a cultural historian and author of Egypt on the Potomac. Bakari Kitwana is CEO of Rap Sessions, Editor at Large of Newsone.com and author of the forthcoming Hip-Hop Activism in the Obama Era. (Third World Press, 2010) RELATED: Bakari Kitwana talks Hip-Hop Examining black images in media

Rap Sessions: Egypt Protests And Ancient History [Audio]

Rap Sessions: Egypt Protests And Ancient History [Audio]

Bakari Kitwana speaks with Amari Jackson and Anthony Browder about the current political uprising in Egypt. Novelist Amari Jackson talks about the relationship of his new novel, The Savion Sequence, to real life events in the Middle East. And Browder, who has conducted over 40 study tours to Egypt over the last two decades, examines the complex ways that today’s cry for freedom relates to ancient history. RELATED: Top 10 Black movies that should have won an Oscar In this discussion both consider the relationship between ancient Egyptian history and contemporary events, fact and fiction, as well as personal and political freedom. Browder calls the movement in Egypt, “One of the best examples in our lifetime of people trying to achieve their freedom nonviolently.” Amari Jackson is a journalist and the author of The Savion Sequence. Anthony Browder is a cultural historian and author of Egypt on the Potomac. Bakari Kitwana is CEO of Rap Sessions, Editor at Large of Newsone.com and author of the forthcoming Hip-Hop Activism in the Obama Era. (Third World Press, 2010) RELATED: Bakari Kitwana talks Hip-Hop Examining black images in media

Rap Sessions: Egypt Protests And Ancient History [Audio]

Rap Sessions: Egypt Protests And Ancient History [Audio]

Bakari Kitwana speaks with Amari Jackson and Anthony Browder about the current political uprising in Egypt. Novelist Amari Jackson talks about the relationship of his new novel, The Savion Sequence, to real life events in the Middle East. And Browder, who has conducted over 40 study tours to Egypt over the last two decades, examines the complex ways that today’s cry for freedom relates to ancient history. RELATED: Top 10 Black movies that should have won an Oscar In this discussion both consider the relationship between ancient Egyptian history and contemporary events, fact and fiction, as well as personal and political freedom. Browder calls the movement in Egypt, “One of the best examples in our lifetime of people trying to achieve their freedom nonviolently.” Amari Jackson is a journalist and the author of The Savion Sequence. Anthony Browder is a cultural historian and author of Egypt on the Potomac. Bakari Kitwana is CEO of Rap Sessions, Editor at Large of Newsone.com and author of the forthcoming Hip-Hop Activism in the Obama Era. (Third World Press, 2010) RELATED: Bakari Kitwana talks Hip-Hop Examining black images in media

Rap Sessions: Egypt Protests And Ancient History [Audio]

Rap Sessions: Egypt Protests And Ancient History [Audio]

Bakari Kitwana speaks with Amari Jackson and Anthony Browder about the current political uprising in Egypt. Novelist Amari Jackson talks about the relationship of his new novel, The Savion Sequence, to real life events in the Middle East. And Browder, who has conducted over 40 study tours to Egypt over the last two decades, examines the complex ways that today’s cry for freedom relates to ancient history. RELATED: Top 10 Black movies that should have won an Oscar In this discussion both consider the relationship between ancient Egyptian history and contemporary events, fact and fiction, as well as personal and political freedom. Browder calls the movement in Egypt, “One of the best examples in our lifetime of people trying to achieve their freedom nonviolently.” Amari Jackson is a journalist and the author of The Savion Sequence. Anthony Browder is a cultural historian and author of Egypt on the Potomac. Bakari Kitwana is CEO of Rap Sessions, Editor at Large of Newsone.com and author of the forthcoming Hip-Hop Activism in the Obama Era. (Third World Press, 2010) RELATED: Bakari Kitwana talks Hip-Hop Examining black images in media

Rev. Al Sharpton: Dr. King And The Living Wage Movement Today

Rev. Al Sharpton: Dr. King And The Living Wage Movement Today

During his lifetime, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. knew that the civil rights movement and the labor movement had to remain firmly united. He understood that there can be no real equality without economic security and that government must play a role in protecting our most vulnerable. Dr. King had gone to Memphis, the city of his assassination, to preach that no job holder should live in poverty. Before the bullet struck him, he had joined striking sanitation workers to march for living wage jobs and a union contract. It is hard to imagine that he would not be angered to see how little real progress we have made since then. Today almost 1 in 3 working families nationally are low-income, according to an analysis of the latest available Census data by the Working Poor Families Project. Many of these working families reside in communities of color. The core issue now affecting many workers, and the unemployed who hope to find work, is the issue that animated King in his final hours: too many jobs barely allow people to survive. They go to work each day and still live in poverty. More than forty years later, the need for living wage jobs is as urgent as ever. The urgency is very clear in a place like New York City, where a record number of working residents, nearly 1.8 million, now rely on food stamps just to get by. Many of them hold jobs in rapidly expanding sectors like retail where companies and developers often receive large taxpayer-provided subsidies and create low-wage jobs in return. But an economy with a growing number of impoverished workers is unsustainable and destructive: more workers will turn to government for help, strain already overburdened public services, contribute less to the tax base, and increase the shared costs of poverty. A better way forward is to ensure that private beneficiaries of public investments act in the best interest of communities and neighborhoods where they are located. From Baltimore to Los Angeles and beyond, cities have begun to require companies and developers receiving taxpayer subsidies to create jobs that enable people to be self-sufficient and avoid destitution. New York City and the rest of the country should follow suit. Establishing a living wage standard for economic development and growth strikes the right balance for our communities and neighborhoods. When companies and developers benefit from government support, they should provide something in return – jobs that allow people to live in dignity. “It was no victory for black men to be allowed to sit in a formerly white-only theater or to rent hotel accommodations which had been segregated, when they had no jobs,” the historian Manning Marable has written. “It was cruel to permit black children to sit in all-white schools, when their mothers had no money to provide for their lunches.” All the marching and organizing during Dr. King’s lifetime was meant to build economic empowerment and security for millions of workers in this country. Using the language of his time, King once put it like this: “Negroes are almost entirely a working people. There are pitifully few Negro millionaires, and few Negro employers… Our needs are identical with labor’s needs–decent wages, fair working conditions, livable housing… conditions in which families can grow, have education for their children and respect in the community.” Dr. King’s legacy of standing up for the working poor animates the growing living wage movement in this country. It is the nexus where the labor movement and the civil rights movement must come together. RELATED: MLK Day

Rev. Al Sharpton: Dr. King And The Living Wage Movement Today

Rev. Al Sharpton: Dr. King And The Living Wage Movement Today

During his lifetime, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. knew that the civil rights movement and the labor movement had to remain firmly united. He understood that there can be no real equality without economic security and that government must play a role in protecting our most vulnerable. Dr. King had gone to Memphis, the city of his assassination, to preach that no job holder should live in poverty. Before the bullet struck him, he had joined striking sanitation workers to march for living wage jobs and a union contract. It is hard to imagine that he would not be angered to see how little real progress we have made since then. Today almost 1 in 3 working families nationally are low-income, according to an analysis of the latest available Census data by the Working Poor Families Project. Many of these working families reside in communities of color. The core issue now affecting many workers, and the unemployed who hope to find work, is the issue that animated King in his final hours: too many jobs barely allow people to survive. They go to work each day and still live in poverty. More than forty years later, the need for living wage jobs is as urgent as ever. The urgency is very clear in a place like New York City, where a record number of working residents, nearly 1.8 million, now rely on food stamps just to get by. Many of them hold jobs in rapidly expanding sectors like retail where companies and developers often receive large taxpayer-provided subsidies and create low-wage jobs in return. But an economy with a growing number of impoverished workers is unsustainable and destructive: more workers will turn to government for help, strain already overburdened public services, contribute less to the tax base, and increase the shared costs of poverty. A better way forward is to ensure that private beneficiaries of public investments act in the best interest of communities and neighborhoods where they are located. From Baltimore to Los Angeles and beyond, cities have begun to require companies and developers receiving taxpayer subsidies to create jobs that enable people to be self-sufficient and avoid destitution. New York City and the rest of the country should follow suit. Establishing a living wage standard for economic development and growth strikes the right balance for our communities and neighborhoods. When companies and developers benefit from government support, they should provide something in return – jobs that allow people to live in dignity. “It was no victory for black men to be allowed to sit in a formerly white-only theater or to rent hotel accommodations which had been segregated, when they had no jobs,” the historian Manning Marable has written. “It was cruel to permit black children to sit in all-white schools, when their mothers had no money to provide for their lunches.” All the marching and organizing during Dr. King’s lifetime was meant to build economic empowerment and security for millions of workers in this country. Using the language of his time, King once put it like this: “Negroes are almost entirely a working people. There are pitifully few Negro millionaires, and few Negro employers… Our needs are identical with labor’s needs–decent wages, fair working conditions, livable housing… conditions in which families can grow, have education for their children and respect in the community.” Dr. King’s legacy of standing up for the working poor animates the growing living wage movement in this country. It is the nexus where the labor movement and the civil rights movement must come together. RELATED: MLK Day

Rev. Al Sharpton: Dr. King And The Living Wage Movement Today

Rev. Al Sharpton: Dr. King And The Living Wage Movement Today

During his lifetime, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. knew that the civil rights movement and the labor movement had to remain firmly united. He understood that there can be no real equality without economic security and that government must play a role in protecting our most vulnerable. Dr. King had gone to Memphis, the city of his assassination, to preach that no job holder should live in poverty. Before the bullet struck him, he had joined striking sanitation workers to march for living wage jobs and a union contract. It is hard to imagine that he would not be angered to see how little real progress we have made since then. Today almost 1 in 3 working families nationally are low-income, according to an analysis of the latest available Census data by the Working Poor Families Project. Many of these working families reside in communities of color. The core issue now affecting many workers, and the unemployed who hope to find work, is the issue that animated King in his final hours: too many jobs barely allow people to survive. They go to work each day and still live in poverty. More than forty years later, the need for living wage jobs is as urgent as ever. The urgency is very clear in a place like New York City, where a record number of working residents, nearly 1.8 million, now rely on food stamps just to get by. Many of them hold jobs in rapidly expanding sectors like retail where companies and developers often receive large taxpayer-provided subsidies and create low-wage jobs in return. But an economy with a growing number of impoverished workers is unsustainable and destructive: more workers will turn to government for help, strain already overburdened public services, contribute less to the tax base, and increase the shared costs of poverty. A better way forward is to ensure that private beneficiaries of public investments act in the best interest of communities and neighborhoods where they are located. From Baltimore to Los Angeles and beyond, cities have begun to require companies and developers receiving taxpayer subsidies to create jobs that enable people to be self-sufficient and avoid destitution. New York City and the rest of the country should follow suit. Establishing a living wage standard for economic development and growth strikes the right balance for our communities and neighborhoods. When companies and developers benefit from government support, they should provide something in return – jobs that allow people to live in dignity. “It was no victory for black men to be allowed to sit in a formerly white-only theater or to rent hotel accommodations which had been segregated, when they had no jobs,” the historian Manning Marable has written. “It was cruel to permit black children to sit in all-white schools, when their mothers had no money to provide for their lunches.” All the marching and organizing during Dr. King’s lifetime was meant to build economic empowerment and security for millions of workers in this country. Using the language of his time, King once put it like this: “Negroes are almost entirely a working people. There are pitifully few Negro millionaires, and few Negro employers… Our needs are identical with labor’s needs–decent wages, fair working conditions, livable housing… conditions in which families can grow, have education for their children and respect in the community.” Dr. King’s legacy of standing up for the working poor animates the growing living wage movement in this country. It is the nexus where the labor movement and the civil rights movement must come together. RELATED: MLK Day

Rev. Al Sharpton: Dr. King And The Living Wage Movement Today

Rev. Al Sharpton: Dr. King And The Living Wage Movement Today

During his lifetime, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. knew that the civil rights movement and the labor movement had to remain firmly united. He understood that there can be no real equality without economic security and that government must play a role in protecting our most vulnerable. Dr. King had gone to Memphis, the city of his assassination, to preach that no job holder should live in poverty. Before the bullet struck him, he had joined striking sanitation workers to march for living wage jobs and a union contract. It is hard to imagine that he would not be angered to see how little real progress we have made since then. Today almost 1 in 3 working families nationally are low-income, according to an analysis of the latest available Census data by the Working Poor Families Project. Many of these working families reside in communities of color. The core issue now affecting many workers, and the unemployed who hope to find work, is the issue that animated King in his final hours: too many jobs barely allow people to survive. They go to work each day and still live in poverty. More than forty years later, the need for living wage jobs is as urgent as ever. The urgency is very clear in a place like New York City, where a record number of working residents, nearly 1.8 million, now rely on food stamps just to get by. Many of them hold jobs in rapidly expanding sectors like retail where companies and developers often receive large taxpayer-provided subsidies and create low-wage jobs in return. But an economy with a growing number of impoverished workers is unsustainable and destructive: more workers will turn to government for help, strain already overburdened public services, contribute less to the tax base, and increase the shared costs of poverty. A better way forward is to ensure that private beneficiaries of public investments act in the best interest of communities and neighborhoods where they are located. From Baltimore to Los Angeles and beyond, cities have begun to require companies and developers receiving taxpayer subsidies to create jobs that enable people to be self-sufficient and avoid destitution. New York City and the rest of the country should follow suit. Establishing a living wage standard for economic development and growth strikes the right balance for our communities and neighborhoods. When companies and developers benefit from government support, they should provide something in return – jobs that allow people to live in dignity. “It was no victory for black men to be allowed to sit in a formerly white-only theater or to rent hotel accommodations which had been segregated, when they had no jobs,” the historian Manning Marable has written. “It was cruel to permit black children to sit in all-white schools, when their mothers had no money to provide for their lunches.” All the marching and organizing during Dr. King’s lifetime was meant to build economic empowerment and security for millions of workers in this country. Using the language of his time, King once put it like this: “Negroes are almost entirely a working people. There are pitifully few Negro millionaires, and few Negro employers… Our needs are identical with labor’s needs–decent wages, fair working conditions, livable housing… conditions in which families can grow, have education for their children and respect in the community.” Dr. King’s legacy of standing up for the working poor animates the growing living wage movement in this country. It is the nexus where the labor movement and the civil rights movement must come together. RELATED: MLK Day

Rev. Al Sharpton: Dr. King And The Living Wage Movement Today

Rev. Al Sharpton: Dr. King And The Living Wage Movement Today

During his lifetime, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. knew that the civil rights movement and the labor movement had to remain firmly united. He understood that there can be no real equality without economic security and that government must play a role in protecting our most vulnerable. Dr. King had gone to Memphis, the city of his assassination, to preach that no job holder should live in poverty. Before the bullet struck him, he had joined striking sanitation workers to march for living wage jobs and a union contract. It is hard to imagine that he would not be angered to see how little real progress we have made since then. Today almost 1 in 3 working families nationally are low-income, according to an analysis of the latest available Census data by the Working Poor Families Project. Many of these working families reside in communities of color. The core issue now affecting many workers, and the unemployed who hope to find work, is the issue that animated King in his final hours: too many jobs barely allow people to survive. They go to work each day and still live in poverty. More than forty years later, the need for living wage jobs is as urgent as ever. The urgency is very clear in a place like New York City, where a record number of working residents, nearly 1.8 million, now rely on food stamps just to get by. Many of them hold jobs in rapidly expanding sectors like retail where companies and developers often receive large taxpayer-provided subsidies and create low-wage jobs in return. But an economy with a growing number of impoverished workers is unsustainable and destructive: more workers will turn to government for help, strain already overburdened public services, contribute less to the tax base, and increase the shared costs of poverty. A better way forward is to ensure that private beneficiaries of public investments act in the best interest of communities and neighborhoods where they are located. From Baltimore to Los Angeles and beyond, cities have begun to require companies and developers receiving taxpayer subsidies to create jobs that enable people to be self-sufficient and avoid destitution. New York City and the rest of the country should follow suit. Establishing a living wage standard for economic development and growth strikes the right balance for our communities and neighborhoods. When companies and developers benefit from government support, they should provide something in return – jobs that allow people to live in dignity. “It was no victory for black men to be allowed to sit in a formerly white-only theater or to rent hotel accommodations which had been segregated, when they had no jobs,” the historian Manning Marable has written. “It was cruel to permit black children to sit in all-white schools, when their mothers had no money to provide for their lunches.” All the marching and organizing during Dr. King’s lifetime was meant to build economic empowerment and security for millions of workers in this country. Using the language of his time, King once put it like this: “Negroes are almost entirely a working people. There are pitifully few Negro millionaires, and few Negro employers… Our needs are identical with labor’s needs–decent wages, fair working conditions, livable housing… conditions in which families can grow, have education for their children and respect in the community.” Dr. King’s legacy of standing up for the working poor animates the growing living wage movement in this country. It is the nexus where the labor movement and the civil rights movement must come together. RELATED: MLK Day

The Launch Of The Hip-Hop Express And It’s Importance To Education [Podcast]

The Launch Of The Hip-Hop Express And It’s Importance To Education [Podcast]

In this week’s edition of Rap Sessions, NewsOne contributor Bakari Kitwana speaks with Dr. William Patterson about a new hip-hop and civic studies project modeled after the early 1900s Booker T. Washington and George Washington Carver’s Jessup Agricultural Wagon. Whereas Washington and Carver brought Tuskegee University via a horse-drawn wagon to sharecroppers in the South, Patterson’s In Search of Hip-Hop Express brings civic studies from the University of Illinois Urban Champaign to Black youth around the US through a mobile airstream trailer retro-fitted with the latest technology. Hip-hop Express teaches Black youth civic engagement and community-building while investigating and archiving the Black experience from a hip-hop perspective.  Patterson emphasizes here that his focus is to engage descendents of the sharecroppers: “Booker T Washington believed if sharecroppers were better educated about finance and the science and technology of agriculture then it would improve their quality of life.” “Sharecroppers often worked seven days a week and had little free time—so Washington believed Tuskegee should go to them,” Patterson says, “One of the ways universities can engage urban youth today is to use technology and other educational tools, along with aesthetics of the city and hip-hop to be the engaging point to inspire community transformation. Our new crop that we have to cultivate is actually the young people in our community. If we provide the right science and appropriate media and technology they then become the stewards of the Black experience and contribute to that legacy.” The creator of In Search of Hip-Hop Express, William Patterson is the founder and co-director of Youth Media Workshop. He teaches educational policy at the University of Illinois-Urbana Champaign. Bakari Kitwana is CEO of Rap Sessions, Editor at Large of Newsone.com and author of the forthcoming Hip-Hop Activism in the Obama Era. (Third World Press, 2011) RELATED: Rap Sessions Podcasts Share this post on Facebook! CLICK HERE: Usher gets kicked in head by female fan trying to be sexy video[from Hellobeautiful.com] Nicki Minaj talks her butt, alter egos, and being a boss on “Chelsea Lately”[from Hellobeautiful.com] Natalie Nunn says she likes Wiz Khalifa [from TheUrbanDaily.com] Jamie Foxx to receive entertainer award at BET Honors [from Theurbandaily.com]